Unusual techniques at the Festival of Quilts 2019

I can’t beleive that it is the end of October, and I’m still working through my pictures from the Festival of Quilts 2019 at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham.

The group today show what you can do with a slightly unusual technique and a little imagination.

The first picture shows that, while sewing together squares of old shirts might sound ordinary, thinking about using the raw edges as a feature can liven things up considerably.

Plain fabric is usually quilted in a matching thread, but using a coloured thread really brings out the pattern. This example is particularly striking, as not only has blue been quilted with its complementary colour, orange, but the stitching is more intensive in some areas, adding additional dimentional contrast. In a venue full of DO NOT TOUCH signs, for obvious reasons, an official was on hand to show how the edging included brightly contrasting fabric:

This double sided piece made of hexagons was getting a lot of attention. It is a lovely idea, but one of those where you would need to plan round your display space. I’m guessing most of us don’t have a place where this could be properly appreciated:

And finally for today, a demonstration of how some simple folding techniques can give a quilt design a lift:

About The Proof Angel

I am a freelance editor and proofreader, working with a wide range of clients from large companies to individuals. I can help you to communicate clearly by carrying out a final check, or by suggesting ideas get your message over. I also have a sideline in textiles, as The Rainbow Angel.
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